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Mindset Family Therapy

What Are the Signs of Depression in Teens?

3.31.17

Quite often, parents misunderstand their adolescents’ symptoms of depression with “just being in a bad mood,” or “personality issues,” or “the time of the month issues,” etc. Yes, we all have those kinds of days. However, when an adolescent is depressed, those symptoms don’t dwindle with time. This is actually a mistake many parents make. Sometimes, they may think it is “just a stage” and wait it out. However, it can only get worse. As you consider the following symptoms, keep in mind that they vary in severity. Depressive symptoms in adolescents: Loss of interest and enjoyment in their favorite activities or other activities. Prefer to be alone rather than with family or kids their age. Have difficulty concentrating at school or other se

Depression and Anxiety in Teens – Questions to Think About

3.31.17

The high numbers regarding anxiety and depression in teens are alarming. Experts keep trying to figure out why the numbers continue to rise. Research confirms what many mental health providers have known for years about this amazing, yet troubled population. When you think about your adolescent, consider the following questions: Are your teens learning healthy coping skills to deal with stressors, anxiety, and depression? Who are their role models and are they learning healthy coping skills from them? When they experience emotional pain, have your kids learned how to deal with it? Do they have the appropriate support from you and professionals if needed? Do you know if your adolescent is involved in self-harming behaviors? If so, is h

Scrupulosity OCD — You Have Choices!

3.30.17

View original article published in Psych Central – “I’m such a sinner. I’m supposed to have pure thoughts. I’m so wicked!” Destiny’s incessant thoughts compelled her to pray, sing hymns, confess, and repent to no avail. Her religious leaders kept telling her that she was not a sinner. They reassured her by telling her that she was a good person. She didn’t know her reassurance seeking was actually a compulsion that kept strengthening her OCD. Her anguish and her need to control her thoughts were affecting her overall functioning. Every time she experienced “impure” thoughts she felt unworthy of happiness or anything good in her life. Her anxiety would swell through her body as a wave that left her feeling guilt and shame, even though she ha

Do I Have OCD?

3.22.17

When you worry frequently about things that are outside of your control, or you must have everything in your life organized perfectly, you may start to wonder if you need to see an OCD specialist. While anxiety does not mean that you have OCD, there are signs of OCD that are very difficult to ignore. What is important to remember is that OCD signs and symptoms are on a spectrum. While you may exhibit some signs, it is the degree of prevalence in your life that matters most. For those experiencing primarily mental obsessions, it is difficult to dismiss a random weird thought as non-sufferers do. Individuals with mental obsessions and compulsions will try to pick apart their thoughts in order to figure them out and resist them. They will also

Do’s and Don’ts to Help your Anxious Child

3.21.17

When children are anxious, parents also get anxious because they want to fix their child’s anxiety. As humans we have an amazing mind whose job is to help us solve problems, and we naturally also want to rescue, fix and resolve our children’s pain and struggles. Unfortunately trying to rescue our children from their emotional struggles can often backfire. Below is a list of the most essential Do’s and Don’ts to help you become a more efficient parent to your anxious child: Do’s: Do validate and acknowledge their feelings. Remember that your children’s perception is their reality. Even when you know their fears are unfounded, they need to know you are there for them, you are listening to them and that you care about them. Do meet them halfw

Mindset Family Therapy

Helping Someone with OCD

3.3.17

There are many faces of this disorder. It can be difficult to watch someone you love spend so much time on their obsessions or compulsions. You may become irritated or angry at the time spent on what you consider irrational rituals. It is important to take a step back and realize that your discomfort is with the disorder, not the person. It is only when you do this that you are in a position to help your loved one overcome something that is making the quality of their life much less than it could be. One of the best ways to help someone with OCD is to encourage them to seek help from an OCD specialist. This can mean admission to an OCD treatment center or individual counseling with a therapist that understands and has extensive specific exp

Mindset Family Therapy

3 Causes of Panic Attacks

3.3.17

Helping someone with OCD takes patience and love but will be worth whatever effort you exert. Therapists can determine what can pre-dispose an individual to panic attacks. Here are three of the most common things that can make an anxiety attack more likely. A Feeling of No Control The biggest cause of anxiety is feeling completely powerless to change a situation. We may feel incompetent or even scared that something bad will happen to us. This causes our body to produce adrenaline, which creates the physical symptoms of anxiety. Poor Coping Skills As children, we learn how to cope with adversity. For those who grew up in environments where these skills were not taught, we don’t know how to soothe ourselves when things don’t happ

Mindset Family Therapy

3 Causes of Anxiety and How to Treat It

1.30.17

Anxiety is a response of the mind and body when there is stress in your life. Feelings of anxiety are present in the lives of most people, and when symptoms of anxiety begin to manifest it’s time to find the best therapy to relieve the symptoms. If you have been dealing with feelings of panic, an overwhelming sense of despair, and you find yourself fearing even the most mundane activities, you may be exhibiting signs of an anxiety disorder. Anxiety from External Events If you are overloaded at work, or you are worried about money, you may be experiencing anxiety caused by external events. A natural disaster can spark anxiety, and it’s important to deal with both the stressor and your response to it. Learning techniques such as m

Mindset Family Therapy

What an Anxiety Attack Feels Like

1.30.17

Anxiety attacks are scary for both the one having the attack and those who do not understand what is happening. Each person experiences a different set of symptoms during an attack. There are certain symptoms, however, that are the most common and appear in one combination or another. Common Symptoms The symptoms of severe anxiety often feel like those of a heart attack. These symptoms often include: *Profuse sweating *Chest pain *Fast-beating heart *Trembling *Weak knees The emotional feelings can be even worse. These include: *Intense fear *Feelings of losing your mind *An urge to escape How It May Look For those who are near someone having an anxiety attack, the symptoms may not be as easily recognizable. Those with severe anxiety often

Mindset Family Therapy

Four Symptoms of Anxiety

1.30.17

Those who have anxiety in their lives are sometimes triggered by specific events. Other times, it’s just the thought of those events that brings on a wave of nervousness. Anxiety as a whole refers to one or more anxiety disorders. These include among others, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and panic disorder. As you can imagine, everyone experiences anxiety differently. Symptoms may vary depending on the type of anxiety disorder you have. However, by understanding your symptoms, you can work to reduce anxiety. Here are four of the most common symptoms. Upset Stomach/Nausea One place that anxiety is likely to affect you is your gut. Your stomach may start to churn. You’re likely to feel nauseous. You may feel the need

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